MTV

Mobile Telecommunications Vehicle (MTV)

2001 Ford E350, extended-body van with the Quigley 4WD package and the Ford Ambulance package. This is a 1-ton, single-rear-wheel vehicle with the Ford Power Stroke© 7.3L Turbocharged Diesel engine. As of April 2015 the ambulance has about 87,000 miles on it, with most of the miles from driving on the North Slope. Tow hitch on the back, bike rack for two bicycles on the front.

Kenwood TM-D710G VHF/UHF Dual Band Mobile Transceiver, APRS / GPS

The AARC Has a New Communications Response Vehicle

AARC Newsletter Apr 2015

The club has taken delivery of a new Communications Response Vehicle (CRV). It is a 2001 Ford E350, extended-body van with the Quigley 4WD package and the Ford Ambulance package. This is a 1-ton, single-rear-wheel vehicle with the Ford Power Stroke© 7.3L Turbocharged Diesel engine. The ambulance has about 87,000 miles on it, with most of the miles from driving on the North Slope. Onboard accessories include siren, emergency flashing lights, rear heating system, rear exhaust fan, inverter, shore power connection, and the auxiliary idle control module. Those of us who’ve set up communications equipment in the dark will really appreciate the fact that the CRV has flood-lights for the left, right, and rear of vehicle – with the three directions individually switched. As is obvious from the first picture, we will have to remove the red flashing lights and the ambulance decals, and then replace the decals with AARC information. Obviously, the CRV will be a prime candidate for “Working Wednesdays.” An independent mechanic referred to the CRV as an “immaculately maintained, solid vehicle.”

The CRV is currently equipped with studded snow tires in very good condition. Obviously, we will have to get street-legal tires for the CRV before 1 May. Many of us saw the soon-to-be CRV when it was on display outside the regular monthly meeting on Friday, 6 March. At that time, the CRV still had the gurney [stretcher] in it. The gurney was not for sale and has since been removed. The next two pictures show the back of the CRV; the first looking aft and the second looking forward. As is obvious in the pictures, there is a lot of storage space in the CRV and there’s plenty of room for workspaces where the gurney was located.

Kent Petty, KL5T, is the person who found this ambulance and the “Silver-Tongued Devil” got it for the AARC at substantially below its “Blue-Book” value, even without adding in the value of the ambulance package. We all owe a great deal of thanks to Kent for his acumen in finding this vehicle and for his work in getting all the pieces of the deal to fall into place. Thank you, sir!

Initially, the plan is to put a table running fore-and-aft where the gurney was located. With that arrangement, two operators can sit very comfortably on the bench-seat located on the passenger’s side in the back of the vehicle. The initial goal for the outfitting is to have the CRV usable for the Women’s Triathlon on 17 May 2015. Longer term, the very-tentative plan is to set up four stations, three in the back and one at the passenger’s side in the front. The passenger site would be a VHF/UHF station, while the three in back would be VHF/UHF, HF/VHF/UHF, and HF in some order. Ideally, all stations would be Winlink-capable, at least. However, the details will have to come out of the engineering design process.

At the general meeting, the question of GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) came up and resulted in substantial discussion. The impetus for the discussion was the overweight condition of the existing CCV. Kent Petty, KL5T, weighed the vehicle on Monday, 23 March. The result of the exercise is that the CRV can carry a full tank of fuel and a total additional load of 1,161 pounds, including the weight of the driver, all equipment, all passengers, and trailer-tongue weight.

In the long run, the plan is to make infrastructure changes to the CRV while removing nonmission-critical equipment from the CCV. This will allow the club to have at least one fully mission-capable mobile vehicle at all times. When this process is complete, radios will be transferred from the CCV to the CRV, and the CCV will be formally decommissioned. As of now, we plan to sell the CCV for a camper conversion, or other purpose.

All in all, the club has obtained a solid, agile vehicle that will be fully mission-capable in the near future. Thanks again Kent for all your hard work.

Lara Baker, AL2R
President AARC